The Motherloot Blog: Product Reviews

Making Your New Year’s Resolutions Work: Light Chocolate Chip Cookies

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I recently ran across a recipe in my Redbook magazine for a light chocolate chip cookie. I was intrigued by the ingredients because there were no fat substitutes or sugar substitutes and only four tablespoons of butter. How could a cookie with no substitutes and little fat actually be yummy?That is the goal in Nick Malgieri’s new cookbook called, “Perfect Light Desserts.” He makes fabulous cookies, pies, and more made with real butter, sugar, flour, and eggs. What a concept, huh? This is the kind of cookbook I have been looking for and all of the recipes are under three hundred calories per “generous serving.”

I was able to check the cookbook out from my library and I was not disappointed at all. The desserts are exactly what I would want if I was trying to eat better, and have no replacement ingredients that leave you with a nasty aftertaste in your mouth.

First, I had to share a picture of my new dessert set of plates & mugs that my best friend got for me for Christmas. Each of the plates has a different design on it and they came with a matching little espresso mug & napkins. Aren’t they so cute? She knows me so well!

Back to my review… I made these Light Chocolate Chip cookies and they were absolutely divine. Not too soft, not too hard, chewy, but not too chewy. Mine did come out a little flatter than I had hoped, but that second tablespoon of whole milk, probably ended up being four tablespoons so I fault only myself.

Each cookie contains a mere 114 calories and five grams of fat. This made me think…how much fat were in the ones I was eating before? I shudder to think! These are perfect if your New Year’s resolution is to lose that extra baby weight or just to eat healthier. (Chocolate chip cookies are healthy, right?)

Hope you can give these a try. Feel free to post your impressions of the recipe under our comments section!

David’s Skinny Chocolate Chip Cookies


1 ¼ cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
½ cup light brown sugar, firmly packed
6 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 large egg
2 tablespoons whole milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 ½ cups (about ¾ of a 12-ounce bag) chocolate chips
2 cookie sheets lined with parchment or foil

Set racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Mix the flour, baking soda, and salt together and set aside. Beat the butter and sugars together by machine with the paddle attachment on medium speed until well mixed (about one minute). Beat in the egg and milk until they are absorbed and then the vanilla. Don’t worry if the mixture looks curdled, the flour mixture will smooth it out. Scrape down the bowl and beater and beat in the flour mixture on low speed. Use a large rubber spatula to fold in the chocolate chips. Chill the dough in the bowl for fifteen minutes to keep the cookies from spreading too much while they are baking. Form the dough into 1 1/2-inch balls or use a small ice cream scoop to form the cookies. Arrange the balls of dough 2 inches apart all around the prepared pans. Bake the cookies for eight to twelve minutes, or until they look dull on the surface, have spread, and are still quite moist. Cool the cookies on the pans on racks for five minutes. Slide the papers to racks and cool the cookies completely. For storing: keep the cookies between sheets of wax paper in a tin or plastic container with a tight-fitting lid.

Per cookie: 114 calories, 5 g total fat, 3 g saturated fat, 2 g protein, 17 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, 11 mg cholesterol, 85 mg sodium


2 Comments

Comments

  1. 1

    I love Cooking Light Magazine’s recipes too, they’re healthy and low calorie but still taste good. I’ll try these out and give them the test: the family. Of course I’ve never had them turn down a cookie yet :)

    [Reply]

  2. 2

    Wow, this is impressive! I can’t wait to try it out myself and see if it tastes as good as the Nestle Toll House recipe (the one I always use). My angle is not the health issue (we have high metabolisms and routinely down butter, eggs, and whole milk without a second thought) but the cost savings – I will cheerfully make c.c. cookies a LOT more often if I’m only using half a stick instead of two sticks of butter.

    One thing I noticed is that while the proportions are different, the total recipe actually makes less than the traditional N.T.H. recipe – compare 1-1/4 cups flour to 2-1/4, 1 egg v. 2, etc. So it looks like the recipe is about half the traditional cookie recipe (still not bad for using one-fourth the butter), while using three-fourths of the chocolate chips.

    Thank you for this recommendation! I am all agog to check out this cookbook now. =)

    [Reply]

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